HomeJIPASandboxJIPA Features

Published by the Air University Press, the Journal of Indo-Pacific Affairs (JIPA) is a professional journal of the Department of the Air Force and a forum for worldwide dialogue regarding the Indo-Pacific region, spanning from the west coasts of the Americas to the eastern shores of Africa and covering much of Asia and all of Oceania. The journal fosters intellectual and professional development for members of the Air Force and Space Force and the world’s other English-speaking militaries and informs decision makers and academicians around the globe.

ISSN: 2576-5361 (print) & 2576-537X (digital)


Editor:

Dr. Ernest Gunasekara-Rockwell (PhD, University of Wisconsin) serves as the editor of the Journal of Indo-Pacific Affairs. Prior to standing up the journal, he was the acting director and managing editor of Air University Press and the acting dean of the Air Force Research Institute. Earlier in his career, he served as a human intelligence collector and Korean linguist for the US Army. Dr. Gunasekara-Rockwell has taught at the collegiate level at institutions of higher education in Missouri, Wisconsin, and New Mexico, and returned to the Defense Language Institute-Foreign Language Center as an assistant professor in the Technology Integration Division for a short stint. In addition to his background in the social sciences and humanities, he has studied several foreign languages, including Hindi, Gujarati, Sinhala, and Korean. In addition to his work with JIPA, he previously served as the editor for the Journal of European, Middle Eastern, & African Affairs and the Wild Blue Yonder journal and wrote a number of cultural orientations and country-in-perspective pieces.

 

Articles submitted to the journal must be unclassified, nonsensitive, and releasable to the public. Features represent fully researched, thoroughly documented, and peer-reviewed scholarly articles 5,000 to 6,000 words in length. Views articles are shorter than Features—3,000 to 5,000 words—typically expressing well-thought-out and developed opinions about regional topics. The Commentary section offers a forum about current subjects of interest. These short posts are 1,500 to 2,500 words in length. Submit all manuscripts to JIPA@au.af.edu.  

The views and opinions expressed or implied in JIPA are those of the authors and should not be construed as carrying the official sanction of the United States Air Force, the Department of Defense, Air Education and Training Command, Air University, or other agencies or departments of the US government.

 JOURNAL OF INDO-PACIFIC AFFAIRS (JIPA)
 600 Chennault Circle, Building 1405, Room 143
 Maxwell AFB, AL 36112-6026
 Tel (334) 543-8008

Read our book reviews, pick out a book to review, and learn more about our program here: https://airuniversity.usaf.afpims.mil/JIPA/Book-Reviews/

Digital Subscription
To sign up for a digital subscription to the journal, please fill out the form found here.
 
Print Subscription
For a free print subscription to the journal, please email us at JIPA@au.af.edu. Thank you!

You can reach our editorial staff at JIPA@au.af.edu.

Features


  • Scenario Planning Methodology for Future Conflict

    Australia’s 2020 Defence Strategic Update has highlighted new and accelerated drivers that indicate a changing and less benign strategic environment. In this light, using effective processes to prepare for new challenges is a critical task for defense planners. Feasible Scenario Spaces is an embryonic tool that may be instrumental in military scenario planning. To be effective, however, it needs to be further evolved to embrace the potential for unconventional threats, including the emerging primacy of information warfare in future conflict.

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  • A Region in Flux: Situating India in Sino-Japanese Ties

    s article explores the future of Sino-Japanese relations while situating them in India’s perspective and evolving strategic out-look. It evaluates the tensions and turfs in Sino-Japanese ties based on the ups and downs in their relationship in the historical and contemporary times with a distinct focus on the East China Sea as a region of immense strategic importance for their political affirmations. It further examines a revisionist China’s grand strategy and advancing military and naval capabilities and the development of a nonpacifist Japanese power, to argue that Sino-Japanese ties will only become more turbulent in the near future. The article sets this discussion within the context of a more assertive, post- Galwan India that has pursued deeper security partnerships with Indo- Pacific countries, especially Japan, to map New Delhi’s Indo- Pacific calculus as Sino- Japanese ties undergo change.

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  • Historically Mine: The (Potentially) Legal Basis for China’s Sovereignty Claims to Land in the South China Sea

    The impact of Beijing’s sovereignty claims in the South China Sea is broad, and these claims are not likely to change in the near future. The PRC will not easily relinquish claims to land it considers part of its sovereign territory—especially when those lands extend China’s military and economic reach hundreds and thousands of miles into the lucrative region. China’s claims of sovereignty appear valid when viewed from the CCP’s unique viewpoint but fail when those views and assumptions are not shared. The conflict between Beijing’s refusal to relinquish the PRC’s claims, and the likelihood that those claims will be rejected by the international community, will result in continued legal, diplomatic, economic, and military competition and conflict in the region.

     
     
     
     
  • Kashmir Imbroglio Resolved: Strategic Options for Pakistan

    This article contends it is time for Pakistan to take a realistic stock of the ground realities of post-imbroglio Kashmir.

  • Indo-Pacific Deterrence and the Quad in 2030

    While debate surrounding the official formation of the Quad will undoubtedly continue and all instruments of power across the diplomatic, informational, military, and economic (DIME) spectrum will be in play, this article will articulate steps that will be required for the Quad to effectively execute deterrence through the lens of military, hard-power solutions. The questions this research seeks to answer are: What will it take, in terms of strategy, investments, and will, for the Quad to credibly deter the rise of an Indo-Pacific hegemon, and how can the Quad collectively provide a military deterrence solution by 2030? Different from previous research, this article will look to provide tangible solutions and demonstrate how the Quad nations can provide that path to deterrence.

     
     
  • The Influence of Arms: Explaining the Durability of India–Russia Alignment

    This article offers a set of historic, political, ideational, and material factors driving the India–Russia relationship forward that require scrutiny. In short, the authors find that while the residue of Cold War collaboration, contemporary geopolitical alignments, and ideological convergence on a polycentric global order all contribute, the material arms relationship provides the strongest and most durable driver of the relationship.
  • Russia–Pakistan Strategic Relations: An Emerging Entente Cordiale

    Extrapolating from recent media reports, articles, and general discussion in the strategic community in Pakistan, this article examines the trends in this new relationship and assesses possible influence Russia might have in shaping future Pakistani security policy and nuclear doctrines.
  • Comparing Space Agency Intervention in Taiwan and South Korea

    To develop their space sectors, Taiwan’s and South Korea’s space agencies intervene differently. This is despite the developmental state literature indicating that the agencies’ ideologies, mechanisms, and preferences will be similar. This article recounts the literature’s expectations about the two agencies. It then reviews what the two agencies are actually doing to develop their space sectors. This article ends by discussing the implications of the two agencies’ differences for stakeholders in Taiwan’s and South Korea’s space sectors and identifying questions to guide future research that builds off this article’s findings.

     
     
  • Competing with China Today

    As the national security apparatus continues to shift toward great-power competition, there is still a significant lack of understanding about the nature of the current competition and how the armed forces can engage within the strategic reality. This article outlines the road to competition with China, as well as the nature of the struggle, to provide clarity on the challenge such competition poses. Within that context, this article provides recommendations for how the military can translate the strategic concepts found within the National Defense Strategy into more tangible actions.

     
     

More Features Articles


Visit Other Air University Press Journals

Join the Conversation

See what other Journal of Indo-Pacific Affairs readers and website visitors have to say. We welcome your comments and suggestions. Visit the Journal of Indo-Pacific Affairs Facebook pageFacebook Logoand join the conversation.

 

 

Disclaimer

The views and opinions expressed or implied in JIPA are those of the authors and should not be construed as carrying the official sanction of the Department of Defense, Air Force, Air Education and Training Command, Air University, or other agencies or departments of the US government or their international equivalents.