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Volume 33 Issue 3, Fall 2019

  • SENIOR LEADER PERSPECTIVE
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    Leveraging Our War-Fighting Capabilities through the Lens of Operational Contract Support

    Brig Gen Alice Trevino, USAF
    Maj Jessica Greathouse, USAF
    Maj Jordan Siefkes, USAF
    CMSgt James Ting, USAF

    Operational contract support (OCS) greatly benefits commanders who comprehend the importance of its use and how to leverage and employ it on the battlefield—to fight and win our nation’s wars. When properly planned for and executed, OCS decisively influences the tactical, operational, and strategic environment. 
  • FEATURE ARTICLES
  • Unexplained Physiological Episodes: A Pilot's Perspective

    Lt Col Justin J. Elliott, USAF
    Maj David R. Schmitt, USAF

    Unexplained physiological events (UPE) have gained infamy among DOD aviators in recent years as both an inflight safety concern and the cause of lost sorties due to well-publicized groundings (F-22, F-18, T-45, T-6, and F-35). Unfortunately, most knowledge of these events is stovepiped into aircraft specific communications channels, which prevents DOD-wide problem solving from occurring.
  • Space Pirates, Geosynchronous Guerrillas, and Nonterrestrial Terrorists: Nonstate Threats in Space

    Gregory D. Miller, PhD
    This article examines potential threats to space from nonstate actors. The genesis of the article is the US’s renewed interest in developing a space force but is applicable to all states with current and potential space capabilities. It focuses on the three types of nonstate actors who will likely target state capabilities: guerrillas and terrorists, both of whom are defined by their political motivations, and pirates, defined by their mostly economic motivations.
  • Thinking Differently about Air Bases:
    Evolving with the Evolving Strategic Environment

    Col Kevin L. Parker, USAF
    Current and future challenges in the strategic environment demand a thoughtful approach to Air Force installations. Air bases will remain the platforms by which Air Force units fly, fight, and win in air, space, and cyberspace. But, increasing threats against them, expanding global reach and interconnectedness, and demanding fiscal constraints call for change.
  • VIEWS
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    Maximizing Human Capital with Innovative Talent
    Management Strategy

    Chiefs Leadership Course 19-B
    Flight 9, Excellence

    This study is an introspective look into maximizing human capital through the effective use of innovative talent management strategies. In particular, the study focused on analyzing the Air Force’s strategy to maximize human capital, identify existing talent gaps, and highlighting how the enterprise applies talent management processes from career accession to retention. Additionally, the research will determine if the Air Force should leverage and adopt other talent management models to effectively manage the Air Force human capital.
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    A Plan for a US Space Force: The What, Why,
    How, and When

    Lt Col Jonathan Whitney, USAF
    Maj Kai Thompson, USA
    Maj Ji hwan Park, Republic of Korea Marine Corps (ROKMC)

    This article will justify why a dedicated organization for the space domain is needed by reviewing the current space military organizations of the US and its nearest competitors—Russia and China—and how the future space organization will be created. We will consider the organization’s objective, how it should be staffed, and how much it will be budgeted.

  • BOOK REVIEWS
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    Howard Hughes: Aviator

    George J. Marrett
    Reviewer: Capt Marissa Kester, USAF

    Howard Hughes: Aviator is a thoroughly researched and well-documented biography on Howard Hughes, with the central perspective on the part of his widely-chronicled life spent in aviation. Written by a former test pilot for Hughes Aircraft Company, the book is an easy-to-follow, informative guide that provides not only a deeper understanding of US aviation history, but also Hughes’ enigmatic life. 

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    Architect of Air Power: General Laurence S. Kuter and the Birth of the US Air Force

    Brian D. Laslie
    Reviewer: Philip C. Shackelford

    Architect of Air Power is a biography of USAF Gen Laurence S. Kuter. Brian D. Laslie is the deputy command historian at North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and US Northern Command, as well as an adjunct professor at the USAFA. He is also the author of The Air Force Way of War: U.S. Tactics and Training after Vietnam.

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    Massachusetts Aviation

    Frederick R. Morin
    John Galluzzo
    Reviewer: Capt Daniel W. McLaughlin, USA
    F
    In Massachusetts Aviation, the passionate duo of Frederick R. Morin and John Galluzzo draw upon their shared love of history to provide a short, but insightful monograph about the busy aviation history of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

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    Military Aviation in the Gulf South: A Photographic History

    Vincent P. Caire
    Reviewer: Capt Miranda Debelevich, USAF

    Vincent P. Caire begins this short, pictorial book with an advisory. This book does not act as an inclusive history of avionics throughout the South. He acknowledges that this would be virtually impossible.

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    America’s Digital Army: Games at Work and War

    Robertson Allen
    Reviewer: Diana Clark Gill

    On a superficial level, America’s Digital Army appears as nothing more than a historical recap of a now defunct Army recruiting program that used a video game called America’s Army to attract teenage recruits. But, upon closer inspection, its author, Robertson Allen, an anthropologist and ethnographer, now working in the private sector at the Hartman Group, plumbs deeper meanings within this framing device of a video game’s life and death.

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    Eyes for the Phoenix: Allied Aerial Photo-Reconnaissance
    Operations, South-East Asia 1941–1945

    Geoffrey J. Thomas
    Reviewer: Maj Peter L. Belmonte, USAF, Retired

    Military forces first used aircraft for reconnaissance. Aerial photography grew into a science during World War I, but at the same time other, more glamorous roles for aircraft emerged—pursuit and bombardment. These roles tended to garner more attention than observation and reconnaissance, and it can be debated that this continues to the present day.

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    OSS Operation Black Mail: One Woman's Covert War Against
    the Imperial Japanese Army

    Ann Todd
    Reviewer: 1st Lt David Chui, USA

    Ann Todd energetically eternalized the harsh realities of the unsung heroes in OSS Operation Black Mail. In particular, the account accurately followed Elizabeth “Betty” McIntosh, the living legend and a retired case officer, who used black propaganda with her team in the China–Burma–India theater against the Imperial Japanese Army.

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