Published by the Air University Press, The Air Force Journal of Indo-Pacific Affairs (JIPA) is a professional journal of the US Air Force and a forum for worldwide dialogue regarding the Indo-Pacific region, spanning from the west coasts of the Americas to the eastern shores of Africa and covering much of Asia and all of Oceania. The journal fosters intellectual and professional development for members of the Air Force and the world’s other English-speaking militaries and informs decision makers and academicians around the globe.

ISSN: 2576-5361 (print) & 2576-537X (digital)


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Articles submitted to the journal must be unclassified, nonsensitive, and releasable to the public. Features represent fully researched, thoroughly documented, and peer-reviewed scholarly articles 5,000 to 6,000 words in length. Views articles are shorter than Features—3,000 to 5,000 words—typically expressing well-thought-out and developed opinions about regional topics. The Commentary section offers a forum about current subjects of interest. These short posts are 1,500 to 2,500 words in length. Submit all manuscripts to JIPA@hqau.af.edu.  

The views and opinions expressed or implied in JIPA are those of the authors and should not be construed as carrying the official sanction of the United States Air Force, the Department of Defense, Air Education and Training Command, Air University, or other agencies or departments of the US government.

 JOURNAL OF INDO-PACIFIC AFFAIRS (JIPA)
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The journal publishes book reviews to inform our readers and enhance the content of its articles. Reviewers are asked to analyze the book and provide an exclusive, original, unpublished, concise evaluation. The first section of the analysis should normally be the shortest and indicate the type of book (biography, anthology, history, monograph, etc.). Include a very short author biographic citation and then describe the context of the book in the literature of the field. Next, thoroughly analyze the thesis and arguments in the work. What are the strong points of the argument? What are the limitations in the work, including author biases? Is the thesis supported? What are the implications of the argument? Are there any profound aspects of the book? This section will be the longest part of the analysis. Finally, the analysis should finish with recommendations for improvement. Clearly state whether this book is worth reading, who may find this book most interesting, and why.

All books are free to reviewers. Each analysis must be submitted electronically within 45 days of book receipt. Limit your text to approximately 1,000 words, carefully edited.

Submit reviews or questions via e-mail to: JIPA@hqau.af.edu.

Current Books for Review

Ahmed, Faiz. Afghanistan Rising: Islamic Law and Statecraft between the Ottoman and British Empires. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2017.

Brooks, Max, John Amble, ML Cavanaugh, and Jaym Gates, eds. Strategy Strikes Back: How Star Wars Explains Modern Military Conflict. Lincoln, NE: Potomac Books, 2018.

Celeski, Joseph D. Special Air Warfare and the Secret War in Laos: Air Commandos, 1964-1975. Maxwell AFB, AL: Air University Press, 2019.

Chang, Paul Y. Protest Dialectics: State Repression and South Korea’s Democracy Movement, 1970-1979. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2015.

Chowdhury, Nusrat Sabina. Paradoxes of the Popular: Crowd Politics in Bangladesh. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2019.

Ci, Jiwei. Democracy in China: The Coming Crisis. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2019.

Doron, Assa, and Robin Jeffrey. Waste of a Nation: Garbage and Growth in India. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2018.

Dye, Peter. The Man Who Took the Rap: Sir Robert Brooke-Popham and the Fall of Singapore. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 2018.

Elrod, Roy H. We Were Going to Win, or Die There: With the Marines at Guadalcanal, Tarawa, and Saipan. Edited by Fred H Allison. Denton: University of North Texas Press, 2017.

Fey, Peter. Bloody Sixteen: The USS Oriskany and Air Wing 16 during the Vietnam War. Lincoln, NE: Potomac Books, 2018.

Frampton, Martyn. The Muslim Brotherhood and the West. A History of Enmity and Engagement. Cambridge, MA: Belknap, 2018.

Glenn, Tom. Last of the Annamese: A Novel. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 2017.

Groh, Tyrone L. Proxy War: The Least Bad Option. Stanford CA: Stanford University Press, 2019.

Jalal, Ayesha. The Struggle for Pakistan: A Muslim Homeland and Global Politics. Cambridge, MA: Belknap, 2014.

Lenoir, Timothy, and Luke Caldwell. The Military-Entertainment Complex. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2018.

Madsen, Grant. Sovereign Soldiers How the U.S. Military Transformed the Global Economy after World War II. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018.

McHugo, John. A Concise History of Sunnis & Shi’is. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 2017.

Merlan, Francesca. Dynamics of Difference in Australia: Indigenous Past and Present in a Settler Country. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018.

Moore, Stephen L. Uncommon Valor: The Recon Company That Earned Five Medals of Honor and Included America’s Most Decorated Green Beret. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 2018.

Ransmeier, Johanna S. Sold People Traffickers and Family Life in North China. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2017.

Rizvi, Mubbashir A. The Ethics of Staying: Social Movements and Land Rights Politics in Pakistan. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2019.

Shahrani M. Nazif, ed. Modern Afghanistan: The Impact of 40 Years of War. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2018.

Singh, Naunihal. Seizing Power: The Strategic Logic of Military Coups. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014.

Swope, Kenneth M. On the Trail of the Yellow Tiger: War, Trauma, and Social Dislocation in Southwest China during the Ming-Qing Transition. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2018.

Trauschweizer, Ingo. Maxwell Taylor's Cold War: From Berlin to Vietnam. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2019.

Wright, Nicholas D., ed. Artificial Intelligence, China, Russia, and the Global Order. Maxwell AFB, AL: Air University Press, 2019. 

Xu, Yan. The Soldier Image and State-building in Modern China, 1924-1945. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2019.

Yablonka, Marc Phillip. Vietnam Bao Chi: Warriors of Word and Film. Philadelphia: Casemate, 2018.

Younger, Stephen M. Silver State Dreadnought: The Remarkable Story of Battleship Nevada. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 2018.

You can reach our editorial staff at JIPA@hqau.af.edu.

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Volume 02 Issue 03 - Fall 2019

  • ARTICLES
  • Australian forces

    Russia, South Asia, and the United States

    A New Great Game?

    Dr. Stephen F. Burgess, US Air War College
    Russia will continue to struggle to regain the level of influence in South Asia that its predecessor, the Soviet Union, had in the 1980s—before it retreated from Afghanistan and before the Central Asian republics gained independence, geographically separating the fledgling Russian Federation from the subcontinent. While Russia has been resurgent in parts of Eastern Europe and Central Asia and has succeeded in creating divisions among NATO members and degrading the Western alliance to a limited extent, the power structure in most of Asia has changed to such an extent that Russia’s reach and influence are limited and will remain so, especially in South Asia.

  • Local and international media outlets film a US Air Force sensor operator inside the 16th Training Squadron MQ-1/MQ-9 simulator at Holloman AFB, which served as a training base for crews of the MQ-1 Predator and the MQ-9 Reaper.

    Airmen and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    The Danger of Generalization

    Drs. Natalia Jevglevskaja and Jai Galliott, University of New South Wales at the Australian Defence Force Academy
    The present inquiry is motivated foremost by continuous developments in technology. As military systems incorporate ever more elements of autonomy, it is essential to assess their potential to become successfully integrated in existing force structures. Given that a human operator is projected to remain a central element of such systems, the success of the integration process is squarely dependent on how humans will adapt to increasing automation. While current unmanned aerial vehicles have only limited autonomous functionality, they nonetheless offer the only example of some of the most technologically advanced systems that have tested human capacity to adapt and where the experience of adaptation has been described by the users of such systems.

  • Trump visits Yokota Air Base, Japan. Pres. Donald J. Trump greets Lt Gen Jerry P. Martinez, US Forces Japan and 5th Air Force commander, during a Troop Talk, 5 November 2017, at Yokota Air Base, Japan. During his talk, Trump highlighted the importance of the US–Japan alliance in the Indo-Pacific.

    Japan and the Nuclear Challenge in a New Era of Rising Tensions

    Balancing between Disarmament and Deterrence

    Dr. Sayuri Romei, Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA
    This article will first examine how Japanese officials and experts have perceived the US security guarantee to their country and the nuclear component of extended deterrence. Subsequently, it will discuss the obstacles that Japan faces to balance the two goals of its nuclear policy. Lastly, it will study how Japan can contribute to the creation of a more favorable regional environment for nuclear disarmament and ensure that the disarmament side of the country’s policy does not remain neglected.  

  • The number of ceasefire violations (CFV) between India and Pakistan has risen dramatically over the past few years. While the increased number of CFVs are a result of the heightened tensions between the two rivals, none of these CFVs has escalated to a full-blown militarized conflict or war between the nuclear-armed neighbors.

    Cooperative Rivalry

    Understanding Indo-Pakistani Ties Using Treaty Networks

    Dr. Michael O. Slobodchikoff (Troy University) and Dr. Aakriti A. Tandon (Daemen College)
    The number of ceasefire violations (CFV) between India and Pakistan has risen dramatically over the past few years. While the increased number of CFVs are a result of the heightened tensions between the two rivals, none of these CFVs has escalated to a full-blown militarized conflict or war between the nuclear-armed neighbors. An analysis of CFVs provides an incomplete picture of Indo-Pakistani relations. The bilateral treaties between India and Pakistan are also important indicators of the status of their relationship. This article argues that the increased levels of cooperation through treaties and the use of treaty nesting in their relationship may be serving a conflict management function by preventing CFVs from escalating into militarized conflict.

  • BOOK REVIEWS
  • Nomonhan 1939: The Red Army’s Victory that Shaped World War II

    Nomonhan 1939: The Red Army’s Victory that Shaped World War II

    by Stuart D. Goldman. Annapolois, MD: Naval Institute Press, 2012
    Reviewed by H. Allen Skinner 

    The beginnings of Nomonhan 1939 came about during Stuart Goldman’s time as a graduate student, when he noticed a connection between the German–Soviet Nonaggression Pact of August 1939 and the Khalkhin Gol (Nomonhan) conflict. After graduate school, Goldman enjoyed a rewarding career in academia, culminating with his work as a research specialist at the Library of Congress. Goldman made profitable use of his spare time during those years to continue research on the Nomonhan campaign, and the end result is an excellent book that ties the military history of the undeclared Soviet–Japanese border war of 1939 to the broader military and diplomatic history of World War II. 
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