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  • Speaking Air-Forcefully: “I’m a Dot”

    Metaphors can make people into so many different things – objects (little pitchers), animals (night owl) and even agricultural products (apple of your eye). Today’s Air Forceful term is a metaphor in which an individual uses to erase themselves: “I’m a dot.”
  • AFCLC Faculty Teach Intro to American Culture to Incoming International Officers

    The Air Force Culture and Language Center’s Dr. Angelle Khachadoorian recently taught Squadron Officer School’s incoming class of International Officers via teleconference on the morning of 8 March. Dr. Khachadoorian, the AFCLC’s Professor of Anthropology, offered a light-hearted but informative lesson on American Cultural Patterns. She included a brief introduction to American Communication Patterns based on curricula developed by Dr. Susan Steen, AFCLC’s Professor of Communication.
  • Speaking Air Forcefully: REBLUE

    The Air Force is blue – a crisp, bright lapis. If an Airman’s blue hue fades a bit or gets “rusty” from too much time in a joint assignment, it is recommended that they reconnect with their Air Force community and their identity as an Airman. They must, like a weapon that has lost its protective oxidation, “reblue.”
  • AFCLC Remains Innovative and Vigilant Amid Pandemic Concerns

    What began as a course set to take place at the Air Force Culture and Language Center (AFCLC) at Air University, the Pre-Assignment Acculturation Course (PAC), could quickly have fallen through the cracks as concerns continue to grow about the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Speaking Air-Forcefully: Defining “Cage / Re-Cage”

    When you finished getting spun up on gyroscopes and Air Force slang, you probably thought, “This information really re-caged my assumptions!” Actually, unless you’re in the Air Force, especially in the flying business, you are unlikely to use the word “re-cage.” The first time I heard this highly evocative term, it was said enthusiastically and positively. Yet, for me, it immediately conjured a dramatic and negative mental image of a cartoonish Mr. Hyde figure, enraged and bursting from his Victorian suit, top hat dented and cravat askew, shrinking down into his normal, placid Dr. Jekyll self.
  • Speaking Air Force-fully: Defining “spun up”

    Let’s start with a question: What does it take to get you spun up? Do you need a tranche (another great Air Force word) of information and maybe some well written Standard Operating Procedures? Or would some frustration and aggravation do the trick of spinning you up? Your response to these questions will vary significantly, depending on whether you are in the Air Force or if you are a civilian.
  • Speaking Air Force-fully: Defining 'kludge'

    The first uniquely Air Force word that I encountered was “kludge,” and to this day, I’ve never heard it spoken by anyone outside of the Air Force. Awkward, guttural and inelegant, it was especially notable because I could not, for the life of me, figure out what it meant.
  • Speaking Air Force-fully

    When I began working for the Air Force Culture and Language Center as a Subject Matter Expert in Culture (aka SME, pronounced like Capt Hook’s clownish pirate boatswain), I recognized that I was immersing myself in a culture that was fairly new to me – that of the United States Air Force. I quickly came to realize that there are many cultural assumptions in the Air Force that I was not aware of. Even now, years later, I am still occasionally caught off guard by a disconnect between my own cultural assumptions, and those of the larger Air Force. That’s when I learn something new about Air Force culture.
  • Diversity Summit 2018: Embracing diversity in the military

    Dr. Angelle Khachadoorian is a self-described “unicorn” in the Department of Defense. An anthropologist with knowledge on indigenous and tribal cultures, she has been called upon by the Air Force years ago to use her expertise at the Air Force Culture and Language Center at Air University.
  • Who Hugs the Man with a Knife for a Hand?

    Humans are humans, and our humanity remains consistent, throughout time and throughout the world. This consistency allows us to ask, and answer, some of the questions raised by anthropologists. Archeology, a subfield of anthropology, involves taking fragmented details of daily life and human activity to build story of living, breathing people and the world they created for themselves.
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