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  • Croatia

  • LEAP scholar shares his journey from humble beginnings in Korea to Air Force flight nurse

    Air Force Major Michael Yim remembers his early days in the United States vividly. At just 15, his family relocated from their home in Korea to Virginia. It was a long journey that came with some harsh realities for the Korean-born teenager now living in the U.S. “I just remember getting here and thinking we looked different, we talked different, and we ate different,” Yim said. “I was made aware of my differences right away.”
  • Panama

  • Honduras

  • Storyteller—Life is an opportunity—don’t waste it

    “Hey, your mom drank poison, and they are taking her to the hospital.” Those were the words Staff Sgt. Gopal Pudasaini, 21st Medical Operations Squadron family health clinic patient advocate, heard as he was in the middle of a school exam in a small village near Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal. Pudasaini started running. Sharp gravel stabbed into his bare feet, but his panic, fear and anger fueled him to run through the pain.
  • Taiwan added to AFCLC’s field guide inventory

    The Air Force Culture and Language Center at Air University continues to expand its Expeditionary Culture Field Guides inventory. This past month, Taiwan has been added to the center’s growing collection of field guides.
  • Speaking Air Force-fully: Defining “spun up”

    Let’s start with a question: What does it take to get you spun up? Do you need a tranche (another great Air Force word) of information and maybe some well written Standard Operating Procedures? Or would some frustration and aggravation do the trick of spinning you up? Your response to these questions will vary significantly, depending on whether you are in the Air Force or if you are a civilian.
  • Speaking Air Force-fully: Defining 'kludge'

    The first uniquely Air Force word that I encountered was “kludge,” and to this day, I’ve never heard it spoken by anyone outside of the Air Force. Awkward, guttural and inelegant, it was especially notable because I could not, for the life of me, figure out what it meant.
  • Speaking Air Force-fully

    When I began working for the Air Force Culture and Language Center as a Subject Matter Expert in Culture (aka SME, pronounced like Capt Hook’s clownish pirate boatswain), I recognized that I was immersing myself in a culture that was fairly new to me – that of the United States Air Force. I quickly came to realize that there are many cultural assumptions in the Air Force that I was not aware of. Even now, years later, I am still occasionally caught off guard by a disconnect between my own cultural assumptions, and those of the larger Air Force. That’s when I learn something new about Air Force culture.
  • Taking the Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI): A Vital Readiness Indicator

    LEAP Scholars, I want to talk to you about an important topic that deals with turning your LEAP education into a more precise measurement of military readiness—the OPI. The OPI provides data that offers planners a more refined picture of “right airman, right skill, right place, right time” when filling billets requiring LREC skills or contingencies where those skills add incredible value.
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