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  • Airpower Lessons for an Air Force Cyber-Power Targeting Theory

    Airpower Lessons for an Air Force Cyber-Power Targeting Theory Steven J. Anderson  Cyber targeting and associated doctrine should be the center of Air Force cyber strategy and its plans to organize, train, and equip a force for full-spectrum cyberspace operations. Understanding what targets cyber operations can affect is critical to deliberate planning or crisis planning. This paper attempts to draw parallels to early airpower targeting principles in order to propose a cyber-power targeting theory based on offense, defense, and exploitation objectives. It draws upon limited artifacts inherent to wielding cyber power—attribution, authorities, and centers of gravity—and acknowledges their impacts upon leaders and practitioners of cyber power. In addition to focusing on the adversary, the theory is intended to cause introspection toward the end of
  • Cyber Workforce Retention

    Cyber Workforce Retention Maj William E. Parker IV, USAF  The US Air Force must develop strategies to effectively retain and sustainably build its workforce of 1B4 cyber Airmen. Doing so will be most critical in the next few years as the Air Force continues to increase its contribution to the nation’s cyber mission forces. This study overviews the current cybersecurity human capital environment and explores the evolution of this new breed of warrior and the plan to move this emerging career field from growth to future sustainment. Also examined are public-sector retention study and initiative findings and Department of Defense retention tools—primarily special and incentive pays—for their potential application in supporting cyber Airmen retention. The study concludes with recommendations for initiatives and focus areas to support not only retention
  • The Green Eyeshades of War

    Military financial management during war is put on trial. Fiscal performance and readiness are scrutinized during various conflicts: World War II, Vietnam, Operations Desert Shield / Storm, and Operations Enduring Freedom / Iraqi Freedom. Each of these conflicts is unique, yet each situation validated the critical need for sound fiscal management and controls. General Spencer demonstrates how the United States has repeatedly failed to learn from its past combat financial management experiences and then offers sound suggestions for remedying that recurring mistake. [Gen Larry O. Spencer / 2016 / 100 pages / ISBN: 978-1-58566-261-6 / AU Press Code: B-144] Read This Book Now
  • The Human Side of Cyber Conflict

    The Human Side of Cyber Conflict Panayotis A. Yannakogeorgos and John P. Geis II In response to a tasking from the Air Force chief of staff, the Air Force Research Institute conducted a review of how the service organizes, educates/trains, and equips its cyber workforce. The resulting findings were used to develop recommendations for how the Air Force should recruit, educate, train, and develop cyber operators from the time they are potential accessions until they become senior leaders in the enlisted and officer corps. This study’s discoveries, analyses, and recommendations are aimed at guiding staff officers and senior leaders alike as they consider how to develop a future cyber workforce that supports both Air Force and US Cyber Command missions across the range of military operations. [2016 / 260 pages / ISBN: 978-1-58566-259-3 / AU Press Code:
  • Letters of Second Lieutenant Charles Wesley Chapman, Jr.

    Charles Wesley Chapman, known to his friends as Carl, was killed in an aeroplane battle northeast of Toul, France, on May 3, 1918, and fell behind the German lines. He is buried near Remoncourt on the Franco-German border, but in French territory. He enlisted for service with the Franco-American Ambulance Corps, and sailed for France on May 19, 1917. He joined the French Army as a member of the Franco-American Flying Corps because he discovered that men for the Flying Corps were badly needed, He went through the French Schools at Avord, Pau, Cazaux, and Plessis-Belleville. In January 1918, he transferred to the American Army and was commissioned as 2nd Lieutenant, going to the front with the 94th Aero Squadron. These letters were published for private circulation in February 1919. [2LT Charles Wesley Chapman, Jr. USAAS / 2016 / 158 pages / ISBN: 978-1-58566-255-5 / AU Press Code: B-141]
  • Unity of Mission

    While much has been written about civilian-military teams in Vietnam and, most recently, in Iraq and Afghanistan, the subject has not been addressed in a single, comprehensive publication containing historical context and reflecting a broad diversity of views. It is the intention of the coeditors of Unity of Mission to fill this gap. The authors are convinced that without unity among military and civilian actors, long-term mission success is difficult at best. They believe the essays contained in this volume attest to this assertion. They are also fully aware that civilian-military teams are not a silver bullet. Rather, at best, such teams serve as a useful tool in a more comprehensive security framework. Nevertheless, in an age of budgetary constraints, the need to coordinate military and civilian resources—hard, kinetic, and soft power—is clear. It is the opinion of the coeditors that
  • Chasing Success

    This book examines how international expectations intersected with the United States Air Force’s fight for autonomy and utility, explains how the service began to change, and asks how airpower—and the US military as a whole—might further deepen its efforts. The author expands perspectives on assessing and directing the use of airpower and encourages further work to maximize both mission accomplishment and civilian protection. The recent evolution of US airpower offers inspiring, if incomplete, evidence that the conduct of war can become more humane while remaining effective. Technology, adversaries, and the goals of armed conflict will continue to evolve, but the central challenge of humanizing war will endure. Part one outlines the challenge that contemporary expectations about the American use of force pose for airpower. Part two describes the Air Force’s adaptation to modern
  • The Changing Nature of Geostrategy, 1900–2000

    Military history is rife with examples of operational successes and failures stemming from the geographical environment. However, are twenty-first-century military operations also contingent on the geographical-physical dimension? Major technological advances during the last hundred years have led to a change in the concept of the physical line of operations. These developments led to the gradual contraction of this line, bringing about its near extinction or virtualization. Dr. Paul Springer observes in the book’s foreword that “the notion that lines of communication might be made irrelevant to modern warfare revolutionized the concept of geostrategy and led to many modern American military practices, including the ability to base attack forces within the continental United States but still threaten enemy forces worldwide.” He adds that “Dr. Tovy’s work promises an interesting
  • Air University Style and Author Guide

    Air University Style and Author Guide Dr. Marvin Bassett  The Style Guide, part 1 of this publication, provides guidance to Air University’s community of writers. It offers a coherent, consistent stylistic base for writing and editing. The Author Guide, part 2 of this publication, offers simple, concise instructions to writers who wish to submit a manuscript to AU Press for consideration. [Dr. Marvin Bassett, Editor / 2015 / 230 pages / ISBN: 978-1-58566-143-5 / AU-1]
  • Guidelines for Command

    Guidelines for Command Air Command and Staff College  The intent of this handbook is to advance the practice of command. The advice and experiences written by prior commanders will help you become a better, more effective leader. [Air Command and Staff College / 2015 / 272 pages ISBN: 978-1-58566-251-7 / AU-2]
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