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  • The Air University Press

    The Air University Press bookstore is currently being moved to a new location. Renovations of the new location are underway and we hope to be operational in the near future. Unfortunately, while our bookstore is closed, we are unable to process requests for hard copy books. We apologize for the inconvenience. All of our publications can be downloaded free of charge from our site: https://www.airuniversity.af.edu/AUPress/.AU Press publications are available at no cost to active duty, total force, and retired military and to Department of Defense personnel and organizations. Publications can be ordered by e-mail at LEMAYCENTER.AU.Press@us.af.mil  or by calling 334-953-4955 (DSN 493).Air University Press (AU Press) is the publishing agent for Air University (AU). Since 1953, it has edited, published, and distributed over 1.1 million student papers, curriculum texts, faculty research pieces,
  • Brown Bag Lessons: The Magic of Bullet Writing [ONLINE ONLY]

    This author unlocks the “magic” of effective bullet writing through proven techniques.  Following them guarantees immediate improvement for anyone who has struggled with formulating statements for recognition packages and appraisals.  The author emphasizes that the “struggle to write comes to an end!” Skillful writing doesn’t have to be difficult. [Eric R. Jaren / 2017 / 134 pages / ISBN: 978-1-58566-278-4 / AU Press Code: B-150].
  • The Redesigned Air Force Continuum of Learning

    The USAF Strategic Master Plan posited five strategic vectors to help prioritize investments, drive institutional change, and operationalize key concepts. These included providing effective twenty-first-century deterrence; maintaining a robust and flexible global intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capability; ensuring a full-spectrum capable, high-end focused force; pursuing a multidomain approach to the Air Force’s five core missions; and continuing to pursue game-changing technologies. Arguably Air Education and Training Command (AETC) supports all of these vectors; however, the call for a full-spectrum capable, high-end focused force falls squarely within the AETC mission. AETC was tasked with preparing for the future, yet much of what we deliver under the banner of force development is lodged in a learning paradigm that has not altered substantially since the
  • The Evolution of Airmen: Conversations with the Chief Master Sergeants of the Air Force

    Fifty years ago, our Air Force made a significant step forward. Our senior leaders recognized the need for an enlisted voice on the headquarters staff and, after a significant vetting and interview process, selected Chief Master Sergeant Paul Airey to become the first Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force, 3 April 1967. In the 50 years since, 17 Airmen have worn the chevrons, championed enlisted development and retired knowing the enlisted force had moved forward. This book is more than a recognition of our past Chief Master Sergeants of the Air Force. It’s a celebration of enlisted Airmen and an acknowledgement of their considerable evolution. It’s a story about our 70 years as a separate service, told through the lens of Airmen who have served every step of the way.  As we celebrate our 70th year as a separate service, let us look to the past and reflect on the barriers we’ve broken
  • Jungle Skippers: The 317th Troop Carrier Group in the Southwest Pacific and Their Legacy

    This study examines the 317th Troop Carrier Group’s experience in the southwest Pacific during World War II to identify its long-term effects. The work focuses on the 317th's role in two specific events, the Battle of Wau in January 1943, and the airborne assault at Nadzab the following September. Each event highlights the combat airlift dichotomy of airland and airdrop. In airland, troops are moved by aircraft and disembark from the aircraft on the ground. In airdrop, troops are moved by aircraft and landed using parachutes. [Maj John D. Poole, USAF / 2017 / 107 pages/ ISBN: 9781585662708 / P-115] Read This Paper Now
  • Adapt or Fail: The USAF’s Role in Reconstituting the Iraqi Air Force, 2004–2007

    The US Air Force has not had much experience in helping to create an air force for a partner nation. Usually the partner nation would already have an air force and the requisite infrastructure, only needing better airplanes, more training, or additional spare parts for the equipment already on hand. In Iraq, however, the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) officially disbanded the country’s air force and the other branches of its armed forces. During the transitional period pending the formal return of sovereignty to the Iraqi people, the CPA re-created the national institutions deemed essential, including a defense force. A handful of USAF advisors deployed to help the Iraqis reconstitute their air force in January 2004. This book summarizes the essentials of that complex sequence of events. This is a story about the ingenuity, flexibility, and perseverance of the USAF Airman-advisors
  • The Achievable Multinational Cyber Treaty: Strengthening Our Nation’s Critical Infrastructure

    The Achievable Multinational Cyber Treaty: Strengthening Our Nation’s Critical Infrastructure Col Mark A. Barrera, USAF  Developing cyber norms and institutions has been problematic due to the competing interests of the major state actors in the multinational environment—especially among Russia, China, and the United States—concerning information freedom and access. The author establishes the genesis of this debate and argues that the United States should move beyond it to the issue of protecting critical infrastructure from cyber attack. Addressing the escalating threats to our nation’s infrastructure and networks, the author recommends pursuing an international agreement singularly focused on securing critical infrastructure combined with improving national regulatory and legislative measures for cyber defense. [2017 / 35 pages / ISBN 9781585662661 /
  • Social Media

    Social Media Lt Col Scott E. Solomon, USAF  The inherent risks and vulnerabilities of the Internet and social networking sites like Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter have cultivated a rich and ripe environment for foreign adversaries and criminals to cherry-pick personal information about Airmen and their missions for nefarious activities. FBI guidance encourages users to reduce their online footprint in cyberspace rather to proliferate it. This paper addresses some of the most common threats and vulnerabilities of the social media environment, the risks of using social media, and current Air Force social media guidance. It recommends revising Air Force social media guidance and outlines cyberspace best practices. An informed workforce can better protect the Air Force mission and reduce the risk of becoming a target of opportunity. [Lt Col Scott E.
  • Is Cyber Deterrence Possible?

    Is Cyber Deterrence Possible? Col Timothy M. McKenzie, USAF  Deterrence in the cyber domain is drastically different and far more complicated than in the other military domains of air, land, sea, and space. Cyber weapons and offensive cyber techniques are relatively inexpensive and easily obtained or developed. The number of adversary groups capable of attacking US networks is large, and our ability to deter each group will vary based on their motives and levels of risk tolerance. An effective cyber deterrence strategy must be multilayered and use all instruments of US national power. This paper explores the difficulties of deterring unwanted cyber activities, sets some realistic expectations for a deterrence strategy, and offers proposals to help mitigate the problems. [2017 / 33 pages ISBN: 9781585662739 / AU Press Code: CPP-4]
  • Resilient Effective Adaptable Leadership

    Adaptation is required to stay ahead of the competition or an adversary, remain relevant, or increase effectiveness. Military leaders must self-evaluate and confront any barriers inhibiting their growth in this area. Sawtelle provides opportunities to reflect on leadership in an uncommon context. Self-reflection—made more credible by a certain level of discomfort — can shed light on personal and cultural blind spots. There are six common blind spots in modern military culture inhibiting the comprehensive development of more advanced leaders to achieve resilient intent: trust, risk, investment of time, ownership, technology dependence, and personal adaptability. These elements can serve as catalysts for reflection and dialogue to aid in the evolution of modern leadership culture to best prepare for surprise, disruption, and crisis. [Jonathan D. Sawtelle / 2016 / 115 pages / ISBN:
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