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  • After meeting at AU’s LREC symposium, Airman and researchers use language skills to impact international security analysis

    655th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Group Reserve Citizen Airman Tech. Sgt. Clark (first name withheld), an analyst with the 49th Intelligence Squadron, is impacting an international security analysis program. Clark is combining deep linguistic expertise with cutting-edge data science to build a Ukrainian-English urban phrase “exonym” dictionary for the Coalition for Open-Source Defense Analysis (CODA) to use in creating an algorithm to predict the outbreak of radicalized violence in Ukraine.
  • Air University center helps shape airpower with GOPAC, COMPAC

    Inside of a conference room at the Air Force Culture and Language Center, general officers and commanders have been quietly meeting, training, and preparing pre-deployment and pre-assignment for their journeys around the world.
  • At home and abroad, an Airman gives back

    Airmen who join the U.S. Air Force after being born and raised in a country other than the United States often say that serving in the military is a way to “give back” to their new home. For one Air Force captain, his work not only gave him an opportunity to serve the United States; it also meant being about to “give back” to his homeland.
  • GOPAC, COMPAC: Shaping airpower with education

    Inside of a conference room at the Air Force Culture and Language Center, general officers and commanders have been quietly meeting, training, and preparing pre-deployment and pre-assignment for their journeys around the world. “There is a great deal of preparation to be completed before deploying anywhere, but this is one opportunity that stands out. Every graduate that I have spoken to made sure to tell me not to miss this course and its amazing training.” Col Charles Corcoran said about the session he attended before traveling overseas.
  • AFCLC professor hopes to return ‘good luck flag’

    Fitted in a frame for preservation, Jessica Jordan is both haunted and intrigued by the tattered Japanese war flag in her office. The worn national flag covered in personal handwritten messages dates to World War II. The flags are known in Japan as a “hinomaru yosegaki” and in English as “good luck flags.”
  • LEAP over the airwaves

    An Air Force Lieutenant Colonel, Laura Hunt admits she was nervous when she walked into AFN Kaiserslautern radio station. It was an early Friday morning and Hunt was getting ready to go live over the American Forces Network airwaves. Her job: tell all of their listeners about the Language Enabled Airman Program.
  • Congo native and Airman inspired by the ‘Tree of Life’

    A canvas painting of a baobab tree dominates the small hallway in the Air Force Culture and Language Center. Hanging on a wall, the red and orange water colors slowly blend to form a breathtaking African sunset overlooking vast grassland. Frayed at the ends, the artwork pays homage to the ancient African “Tree of Life”. The tree is a cultural and national symbol in Africa, known for its healing power, and has been a source of inspiration for Air Force Technical Sergeant Alain Mukendi.
  • Who Hugs the Man with a Knife for a Hand?

    Humans are humans, and our humanity remains consistent, throughout time and throughout the world. This consistency allows us to ask, and answer, some of the questions raised by anthropologists. Archeology, a subfield of anthropology, involves taking fragmented details of daily life and human activity to build story of living, breathing people and the world they created for themselves.
  • ‘A dream come true’: A trajectory through trial, tragedy shapes Air Force career

    Capt. Lesly Toussaint isn’t your average Airman. Even if you overlook his advanced degrees (he has two, and they are from universities in France and Canada,) his rise from enlisted Air Reserve technician to commissioned officer, and his fluency in three languages – he would still stand out.
  • Air Force Scholar LEAPs to the top of his ISOS class

    Growing up, Captain Rocque Gartland’s abuelita would tell him stories about his family, his Chilean heritage, and what is means to be “lo mejor”. Translation: the best “You don’t have to always be the best, but you should always do your best,” Capt Rocque Gartland said, “work as hard as you can and let the results speak for themselves”.
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