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  • WSJ salutes Air Force Culture and Language Center’s mobile field guides, app

    Titled “Six Indispensable Apps for Business Travelers,” a recent Wall Street Journal article describes the Air Force Culture and Language Center’s app as a “must have” for globe-trotters seeking worldly etiquette.
  • “I would not be an Air Force officer if it wasn’t for LEAP”

    When 1st Lieutenant Gorge Hernandez-Rodriguez enlisted in 2008, he was living in Puerto Rico, struggling financially, and looking for a way to support himself through college. Rodriguez knew the Air Force would afford him those opportunities, but he had no idea that his commitment and his language skills would help him grow both professionally and personally.
  • Public Affairs, the Peruvian Air Force, and Partnerships

    “I remember growing up in Minnesota and watching my dad and my brother”. It was within the walls of her family’s kitchen where 2nd Lieutenant Madeline Krpan’s desire to join the Air Force was awakened at a young age. Her father’s vivid tales of life in the Army combined with her brother’s experience in the Air Force served as inspiration for Krpan early on.
  • CMSAF Wright on the Air Force Culture and Language Center: ‘This is a great opportunity’

    Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force Kaleth O. Wright listened intently as the Air Force Culture and Language Center’s Director Howard Ward shared the Center’s mission and vision with the audience during this year’s Senior Enlisted Leader International Summit (SELIS).
  • At home and abroad, an Airman gives back

    Airmen who join the U.S. Air Force after being born and raised in a country other than the United States often say that serving in the military is a way to “give back” to their new home. For one Air Force captain, his work not only gave him an opportunity to serve the United States; it also meant being about to “give back” to his homeland.
  • Congo native and Airman inspired by the ‘Tree of Life’

    A canvas painting of a baobab tree dominates the small hallway in the Air Force Culture and Language Center. Hanging on a wall, the red and orange water colors slowly blend to form a breathtaking African sunset overlooking vast grassland. Frayed at the ends, the artwork pays homage to the ancient African “Tree of Life”. The tree is a cultural and national symbol in Africa, known for its healing power, and has been a source of inspiration for Air Force Technical Sergeant Alain Mukendi.
  • Who Hugs the Man with a Knife for a Hand?

    Humans are humans, and our humanity remains consistent, throughout time and throughout the world. This consistency allows us to ask, and answer, some of the questions raised by anthropologists. Archeology, a subfield of anthropology, involves taking fragmented details of daily life and human activity to build story of living, breathing people and the world they created for themselves.
  • ‘A dream come true’: A trajectory through trial, tragedy shapes Air Force career

    Capt. Lesly Toussaint isn’t your average Airman. Even if you overlook his advanced degrees (he has two, and they are from universities in France and Canada,) his rise from enlisted Air Reserve technician to commissioned officer, and his fluency in three languages – he would still stand out.
  • A warm welcome: LEAP participant meets Chinese PLAAF leaders

    Midday and middle of the week, a wave of blue and navy uniforms washed over the inner circle of Air War College. Decorated in lapels, badges, and insignia, from a far, the group looked like one synchronous unit. But up close, it was an obvious blend of foreign and U.S. military members: the Chinese People’s Liberation Army Air Force leaders and United States Air Force service members.
  • Culture and Language…An Airman’s Perspective

    Airmen have a unique way of thinking about things and when you study our culture, it’s easy to explain. We are the legacy of pioneers who dared to defy gravity. Our heritage is to take to the heights and not only see but think about everything in new dimensions. It’s only fitting then that Airmen should innately understand how culture and language can enhance the application of airpower, support building alliances, and achieve unparalleled interoperability with valued partners.
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