HomeAFCLC HomeArticles

Air Force Culture and Language Center Article Search

Air Force Culture and Language Center Article Dashboard

Results:
Tag: Language
Clear
  • Get to know: AFCLC Asia Pacific Expert Dr. Jessica Jordan

    Dr. Jessica Jordan has a Ph.D. in History (Modern Japan) from the University of California, San Diego. She speaks Japanese fluently and is currently serving as the Air Force Culture and Language Center’s Assistant Professor of Regional Cultural Studies for Asia. Her deeply rooted knowledge is helping to educate men and women of the Air Force and shape the future of Air Power.
  • ‘Surreal’: Air Force Major relies on military, language training in aircraft crash rescue

    One minute, you’re having a well-deserved beer after a long hike. The next minute, all hell breaks loose, and you find yourself in the middle of a dangerous crisis. How do you react? What do you know that could be the difference between life and death? Military training was key for Maj. Braden Coleman, a C-17 pilot currently in training at the Joint Military Attaché School in Washington, DC. Braden is a Foreign Area Officer, which means he spent 47 weeks at the Defense Language School in Monterey, Calif., learning Urdu, the official language of Pakistan, and honing his cross-cultural skills. The culmination of his training was a cultural immersion in South Asia in 2017. He was sent overseas to visit several countries, practice his language abilities, and “get the lay of the land,” he said.
  • Francophone Captain shines in Africa

    With time spent in more than 13 African countries, Capt. Megan Gallagher is not your typical U.S. Air Force officer. As part of the 818th Mobility Support Advisory Squadron, Gallagher spends about half her time traveling from her home station at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst to various locations across Africa, helping partner nations in almost every capacity associated with building strong aviation enterprises.
  • More than words: Different languages also means different ways of communicating. This Air Force staff sergeant is excelling at the challenge

    If you are a staff sergeant working in food service in the U.S. Air Force, a “by-name” request for your support from the Service’s top non-commissioned officer is notable and rare event — but that’s just what happened to Staff Sgt. Jason Sugimoto, a participant in the Air Force Culture and Language Center’s Language Enabled Airman Program. LEAP is a career-spanning program to sustain, enhance and use the existing language skills of Airmen. The objective of LEAP is to develop cross-culturally competent leaders across all Air Force specialties with working-level foreign language proficiency.
  • Speaking the lingo: Ethiopia BPC

    Amharic is not a widespread language, but it is spoken by the 100+ million inhabitants of Ethiopia. This country in Africa is one of the few to have resisted colonization and has a proud heritage and culture.
  • LEAP Spotlight: Maj Charlynne McGinnis

    “Thanks to LEAP, I felt confident conversing in Filipino when we met up with Philippine key leaders at the US Ambassador's house and discussed political and military concerns shared by both countries. Highlight of the night was former President Fidel Ramos unexpectedly showing up!”
  • Language, Culture and medical knowledge boosts ties for Airman, Bundeswehr

    Language and cultural training, packed in with the right amount of Air Force job proficiency, can culminate into a valuable product. In November 2016, the German military spent four weeks working alongside that product as, 1st Lt Nadine Suh, a health services administrator assigned to 22d Medical Support Squadron at McConnell AFB, Kansas visited their largest Army hospital as a pioneer participant of the Language Enabled Airman Program.
  • Air University language program prepares Captain in search for missing WWII Airmen

    September 2016, an American B-24 bomber aircraft lies crashed at the bottom of the ocean, off the coast of Italy. Its 8 man crew entombed among the mangled fuselage and sea life for decades. It’s time to bring them home, but before that can be done, someone has to communicate between the Italian government and US agency trying to find them. That’s where Capt. Catanese comes in.
  • LEAP: Experiencing Germany’s largest military hospital

    In October 2016, I received the unique opportunity to spend four weeks at the largest Bundeswehr (Armed Forces of Germany) hospital as part of the Air Force’s Language Enabled Airmen Program (LEAP). This rare opportunity not only allowed me to practice my language skill, but I was also able to learn about a foreign military’s medical service, hospital administration, and their national health care system, all while building partnerships.
  • There and Back Again… and Here and There: Medical officer uses LEAP and DIMO to use French skills anywhere

    Managed by the Air Force Culture and Language Center (AFCLC), the Language Enabled Airman Program (LEAP), is a career-spanning program to sustain, enhance, and assist with the utilization of the existing language skills of general purpose forces. LEAP has postured one of its participants, Maj Sylvia Kim, to carve out a unique career path thanks to its intensive training program.
RSS